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Who Is Ruth Bader Ginsburg?

She was only five feet tall, had a terrible singing voice, and fought injustice wherever she saw it. Her name was Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
Ages 9+
Pages 112
Publisher Penguin Random House
Coming Sep 2020

Average Rating

107 Reviews
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What the Book is About

This is a short, fast-paced, and very informative biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who became a successful lawyer and then a judge at a time when women were expected to stay at home and look after their children. Ruth fought to be given the opportunity to use her brain in a challenging career, just as a man would, and she has spent her life and career fighting for equality for others. Kids will learn about and be inspired by Ruth’s life and her passion for justice.

Jewish Content & Values

  • As a child Ruth spent her birthday at an orphanage, where her mother brought ice cream for the children. Her mother taught her to do tzedakah, to care for others less fortunate, and Ruth grew up wanting to help change people’s lives for the better.
  • Ruth’s parents’ experiences of anti-Semitism in Europe, her knowledge of the Holocaust (she was 12 when World War II ended), and her own experience of seeing signs in the United States saying “No dogs or Jews allowed” made her determined to fight discrimination wherever she saw it.
  • Ruth’s grandchildren called her Bubbie (Yiddish for grandma).

Positive Role Models

  • As a lawyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg always fought for justice for anyone she felt was suffering from unfair discrimination. She persevered to become a lawyer at a time when society had very rigid ideas about gender roles, and she was a staunch advocate for women’s rights and gender equality.
  • Ruth’s husband, Marty Ginsburg, was an unusual husband for the 1950s. Like Ruth, he was a believer in gender equality. He fully supported Ruth’s aspirations to be a lawyer and a judge, did all the cooking at home, and did his fair share of the childcare and cleaning.

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

Learning about Justice Ginsburg’s life and accomplishments can serve as a call to action. Which of Ruth’s values resonated with you? How does living those values honor her legacy?

More for You

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was raised in an observant home, but she became disillusioned with Orthodox Judaism when, as a woman, she was not permitted to be part of the minyan at her mother’s funeral. However, Ruth retained her ties to her Jewish heritage. In 2015, she co-wrote an essay about the roles of five key women in the Passover story: Moses' mother, Yocheved; the midwives Shifra and Puah; Pharoah's daughter, Batya; and Moses' sister, Miriam. The words "Tzedek, tzedek, tirdof" (justice, justice shall you pursue) from Deuteronomy hung on the wall of Ruth’s office.
What the Book is About

What the Book is About

This is a short, fast-paced, and very informative biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who became a successful lawyer and then a judge at a time when women were expected to stay at home and look after their children. Ruth fought to be given the opportunity to use her brain in a challenging career, just as a man would, and she has spent her life and career fighting for equality for others. Kids will learn about and be inspired by Ruth’s life and her passion for justice.

Jewish Content & Values

  • As a child Ruth spent her birthday at an orphanage, where her mother brought ice cream for the children. Her mother taught her to do tzedakah, to care for others less fortunate, and Ruth grew up wanting to help change people’s lives for the better.
  • Ruth’s parents’ experiences of anti-Semitism in Europe, her knowledge of the Holocaust (she was 12 when World War II ended), and her own experience of seeing signs in the United States saying “No dogs or Jews allowed” made her determined to fight discrimination wherever she saw it.
  • Ruth’s grandchildren called her Bubbie (Yiddish for grandma).

Positive Role Models

  • As a lawyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg always fought for justice for anyone she felt was suffering from unfair discrimination. She persevered to become a lawyer at a time when society had very rigid ideas about gender roles, and she was a staunch advocate for women’s rights and gender equality.
  • Ruth’s husband, Marty Ginsburg, was an unusual husband for the 1950s. Like Ruth, he was a believer in gender equality. He fully supported Ruth’s aspirations to be a lawyer and a judge, did all the cooking at home, and did his fair share of the childcare and cleaning.

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

Learning about Justice Ginsburg’s life and accomplishments can serve as a call to action. Which of Ruth’s values resonated with you? How does living those values honor her legacy?

More for You

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was raised in an observant home, but she became disillusioned with Orthodox Judaism when, as a woman, she was not permitted to be part of the minyan at her mother’s funeral. However, Ruth retained her ties to her Jewish heritage. In 2015, she co-wrote an essay about the roles of five key women in the Passover story: Moses' mother, Yocheved; the midwives Shifra and Puah; Pharoah's daughter, Batya; and Moses' sister, Miriam. The words "Tzedek, tzedek, tirdof" (justice, justice shall you pursue) from Deuteronomy hung on the wall of Ruth’s office.