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Sydney A. Frankel's Summer Mix-Up

Ages

9+
Sydney can’t wait to spend the summer chilling with her BFF, Maggie. Then her mom signs her up for a dance class, hoping that Sydney will overcome her shyness and perform in front of actual PEOPLE. That’s not going to happen, but what Mom doesn’t know can’t hurt her…
 
Ages 9+
Pages 254
Publisher Kar-Ben
Coming Jun 2021
Awards
PJ Our Way Author Incentive Award Winner

Average Rating

24 Reviews
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What the Book Is About

Sydney’s looking forward to spending the summer reading and hanging out with her BFF, Maggie – basically anything to avoid being the center of attention. But Sydney’s mom decides that she should make an effort to build her confidence and signs her up for a dance class at the JCC. Sydney and Maggie are horrified but soon come up with what seems to be an ingenious way to save their summer. In this contemporary story, Sydney’s realistic fears are treated with sympathy and plenty of humor.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • The book is sprinkled with Yiddish words and cultural Jewish references: Sydney’s grandma, Bubbe Rose, takes a Zumba class at her temple and says Sydney’s mom is stubborn like a stale matzo ball. Sydney’s class is held at the Jewish Community Center. Sydney’s dad calls her Sheyne Meydl (pretty girl).
  • Sydney will have a bat mitzvah when she is 13, and she brings kugel to welcome new neighbors because “hospitality [hachnasat orchim] does count as a mitzvah.”. 
  • Sydney has Shabbat dinner at Maggie’s house, where Maggie’s brother says the hamotzi blessing over the challah. Sydney’s family celebrates Jewish holidays including Passover and Hanukkah.

Sydney is terrified of speaking in public and hates being the center of attention to the point that she avoids doing things that she would probably enjoy. Over the course of the book, she learns to step outside her narrow comfort zone and begins to overcome her fears. She also comes to understand that everyone has their own issues, which helps her to become a more compassionate person and a better friend.

Maggie’s older brother and his girlfriend kiss in an early scene, and Maggie has a crush on a boy in the neighborhood, but it’s all age-appropriate.

Talk It Over

Sydney and Maggie hatch a plan that they know will upset Sydney’s mom if she finds out about it. If you were in Sydney’s shoes, would you do what she did? Why or why not?

More for You

Sydney and Maggie take summer classes at their local Jewish Community Center (JCC). JCCs have been part of Jewish life in the United States since 1854. The original JCC, the Hebrew Young Men’s Literary Association, focused on helping Jewish immigrants to settle into life in the United States and become more American. Now, more than 350 JCCs and YM-YWHAs across the country offer classes in subjects of Jewish interest alongside summer camps, preschools, sports, activities for seniors, and more.
 
What the Book Is About

What the Book Is About

Sydney’s looking forward to spending the summer reading and hanging out with her BFF, Maggie – basically anything to avoid being the center of attention. But Sydney’s mom decides that she should make an effort to build her confidence and signs her up for a dance class at the JCC. Sydney and Maggie are horrified but soon come up with what seems to be an ingenious way to save their summer. In this contemporary story, Sydney’s realistic fears are treated with sympathy and plenty of humor.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • The book is sprinkled with Yiddish words and cultural Jewish references: Sydney’s grandma, Bubbe Rose, takes a Zumba class at her temple and says Sydney’s mom is stubborn like a stale matzo ball. Sydney’s class is held at the Jewish Community Center. Sydney’s dad calls her Sheyne Meydl (pretty girl).
  • Sydney will have a bat mitzvah when she is 13, and she brings kugel to welcome new neighbors because “hospitality [hachnasat orchim] does count as a mitzvah.”. 
  • Sydney has Shabbat dinner at Maggie’s house, where Maggie’s brother says the hamotzi blessing over the challah. Sydney’s family celebrates Jewish holidays including Passover and Hanukkah.

Sydney is terrified of speaking in public and hates being the center of attention to the point that she avoids doing things that she would probably enjoy. Over the course of the book, she learns to step outside her narrow comfort zone and begins to overcome her fears. She also comes to understand that everyone has their own issues, which helps her to become a more compassionate person and a better friend.

Maggie’s older brother and his girlfriend kiss in an early scene, and Maggie has a crush on a boy in the neighborhood, but it’s all age-appropriate.

Talk It Over

Sydney and Maggie hatch a plan that they know will upset Sydney’s mom if she finds out about it. If you were in Sydney’s shoes, would you do what she did? Why or why not?

More for You

Sydney and Maggie take summer classes at their local Jewish Community Center (JCC). JCCs have been part of Jewish life in the United States since 1854. The original JCC, the Hebrew Young Men’s Literary Association, focused on helping Jewish immigrants to settle into life in the United States and become more American. Now, more than 350 JCCs and YM-YWHAs across the country offer classes in subjects of Jewish interest alongside summer camps, preschools, sports, activities for seniors, and more.