Mode

kid

parent

Hudi’s dad wants him to play sports and his mom wants him to lose weight. But Hudi’s happy the way he is, cracking jokes and making people laugh. What can he do?
Ages 9+
Pages 208
Publisher HarperCollins
Coming Dec 2022
Awards
PJ Our Way Author Incentive Award Winner
School Library Journal Starred Review

Average Rating

21 Reviews
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What the Book Is About

This is a fictionalized graphic memoir about Yehudi Mercado’s experience as a Jewish Mexican boy growing up in Texas in the 1980s. He's fat and funny, but his super-athletic father wants him to be an athlete. We see Hudi try multiple sports without much luck, before finally turning to football, where his size is an advantage. However, Hudi is clearly giving up a part of himself – his humor and kindness – when he follows the coach’s instructions to intentionally injure players on the other team. Ultimately, Hudi finds his way back to his true self and his true passion, the stage. Adding humor and pathos is Chunky, Hudi’s imaginary friend and mascot. Both text and art are amusing in this fast-paced story featuring a very relatable protagonist.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • Hudi’s mother is Jewish. An illustration shows a menorah in the house and a mezuzah in the doorway.
  • Hudi’s older sister is preparing for her bat mitzvah, and we see Hudi practicing Hebrew prayers.
  • Scenes at the synagogue include bagel day and the bat mitzvah.

Content Advisory

Hudi is frequently fat-shamed, but is admirably unfazed by it all. He plays with toy guns at a sleepover and asks his mom for one, but she refuses. The football coach wants Hudi to physically harm another player, and when Hudi hesitates, the coach, his teammates, and the crowd chant, “Kill him!” There’s some underlying sadness, as Hudi tries to be an athlete to make his father proud and also as his father loses his job. All these issues are age appropriate and well handled.
 
What the Book Is About

What the Book Is About

This is a fictionalized graphic memoir about Yehudi Mercado’s experience as a Jewish Mexican boy growing up in Texas in the 1980s. He's fat and funny, but his super-athletic father wants him to be an athlete. We see Hudi try multiple sports without much luck, before finally turning to football, where his size is an advantage. However, Hudi is clearly giving up a part of himself – his humor and kindness – when he follows the coach’s instructions to intentionally injure players on the other team. Ultimately, Hudi finds his way back to his true self and his true passion, the stage. Adding humor and pathos is Chunky, Hudi’s imaginary friend and mascot. Both text and art are amusing in this fast-paced story featuring a very relatable protagonist.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • Hudi’s mother is Jewish. An illustration shows a menorah in the house and a mezuzah in the doorway.
  • Hudi’s older sister is preparing for her bat mitzvah, and we see Hudi practicing Hebrew prayers.
  • Scenes at the synagogue include bagel day and the bat mitzvah.

Content Advisory

Hudi is frequently fat-shamed, but is admirably unfazed by it all. He plays with toy guns at a sleepover and asks his mom for one, but she refuses. The football coach wants Hudi to physically harm another player, and when Hudi hesitates, the coach, his teammates, and the crowd chant, “Kill him!” There’s some underlying sadness, as Hudi tries to be an athlete to make his father proud and also as his father loses his job. All these issues are age appropriate and well handled.