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kid

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Alley & Rex

by: Joel Ross  

Ages

9+
Sixth grader Alley Katz has a talent for getting in trouble. But when his burrito hits the fan — and the kindergarteners — he’s in really big trouble. His punishment? He’ll be transferred to the dreaded Steggles Academy if he doesn’t get an A on his science test. Can a 4th grader in a bunny suit save the day?
Ages 9+
Pages 144
Publisher Simon & Schuster
Coming Mar 2022
Awards
PJ Our Way Author Incentive Award Winner

Average Rating

27 Reviews
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What the Book Is About

Alley Katz doesn’t make very good choices, or at least that’s what the adults in his life are always telling him. After a particularly messy incident involving a burrito, a ceiling fan, and a bunch of kindergarteners, Principal Kugelmeyer tells Alley that if he doesn’t get an A on the next science test, he’ll have to transfer to the dreaded Steggles Academy, where his horrible Grannie Blatt is the lunch lady.
 
Alley’s not happy about being paired with a peer mentor to help him with the test, especially when he finds out it’s Rex, the shy fourth grader who wears a bunny suit and carries a briefcase. But Alley needs Rex to stay in school, and Rex needs Alley to survive school.
 
Readers will love this hilarious, highly illustrated book about how two boys, “one with the heart of a lion and the test scores of a baked potato, the other a shy boy genius in a bunny suit,” become friends.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • Alley and his family are Jewish, and Alley celebrates Shabbat with his Bubbe and Zayde.
  • Alley’s Grannie Blatt lights a yahrzeit candle in memory of her father, who fought fascists in Spain in the 1930s and died in WWII.
  • Alley is a kind boy who defends Rex against the other boys who bully him; an example of the Jewish value of tzedek tirdof, or pursuing justice.

Content Advisory

None.
What the Book Is About

What the Book Is About

Alley Katz doesn’t make very good choices, or at least that’s what the adults in his life are always telling him. After a particularly messy incident involving a burrito, a ceiling fan, and a bunch of kindergarteners, Principal Kugelmeyer tells Alley that if he doesn’t get an A on the next science test, he’ll have to transfer to the dreaded Steggles Academy, where his horrible Grannie Blatt is the lunch lady.
 
Alley’s not happy about being paired with a peer mentor to help him with the test, especially when he finds out it’s Rex, the shy fourth grader who wears a bunny suit and carries a briefcase. But Alley needs Rex to stay in school, and Rex needs Alley to survive school.
 
Readers will love this hilarious, highly illustrated book about how two boys, “one with the heart of a lion and the test scores of a baked potato, the other a shy boy genius in a bunny suit,” become friends.
 

Jewish Content & Values

  • Alley and his family are Jewish, and Alley celebrates Shabbat with his Bubbe and Zayde.
  • Alley’s Grannie Blatt lights a yahrzeit candle in memory of her father, who fought fascists in Spain in the 1930s and died in WWII.
  • Alley is a kind boy who defends Rex against the other boys who bully him; an example of the Jewish value of tzedek tirdof, or pursuing justice.

Content Advisory

None.